Category: In-Home Care

While the symptoms of multiple sclerosis may vary between individuals, late-stage MS is evidenced by a marked reduction in mobility and increased dependence on others for the most basic of life functions. Early stages of MS may begin with simple muscle weakness, difficulty speaking, tremors or dizziness and these symptoms increase in intensity over time. Understanding what happens during late-stage MS is vital to help provide a caring and safe environment for your loved one. 

As we age, it can be difficult to realize that we don't simply bounce back from challenges as we did decades before. A fall to a senior could mean much more than a loss of mobility: it could require extensive rehabilitation, surgery or other life-altering challenges. As they're recovering, seniors are likely to need mental as well as physical support in order to improve their health and mobility and these suggestions may help. 

It is not uncommon for caregivers to become overly stressed and exhausted -- they are often juggling families, a career, paying bills and also taking care of their loved ones. This continuous cycle of pressure can cause caregivers to become mentally distraught as well as physically ill over time, especially if there are no breaks that allow them to recoup their energies. Respite care is a crucial part of any family's Alzheimer's journey, as this painful disease can be particularly difficult for caregivers to retain a positive outlook.

There comes a time in many lives where individuals are no longer able to fully care for themselves. While your loved one may not be ready for a full-time nursing home, they do need some assistance with everyday activities such as light housekeeping and companionship. Elderly companion care is not meant to take the place of medical care. Instead, it's targeted to provide seniors who are still able to live independently a level of emotional support as well as physical assistance. These paid companions allow elderly individuals to enjoy their life without stress.